Big Tents and Svetlana – CyberTracker

Once in awhile I have the urge to spend the night in my big tent. I find that it clears my head and gives me a chance to listen to this crude little radio receiver that was gifted to me a couple of years ago. I just kick back and relax and I enjoy listening in on some interesting and some not so interesting conversations, rambling manifestos, diatribes, lectures, or whatever other nonsense the broadcaster decides to expand on. There have been a couple of broadcasts that have caught my attention of late because of the frequency of broadcast and the rather crude technology the broadcaster keeps discussing. The first topic of interest is the old networking design called “daisy chaining”. I was shocked that the broadcaster kept mentioning this technology as is old outdated and rarely in use. I’ve seen references to “daisy reader” as well. The second networking tool that I’ve been hearing about is the “hub”. The hub is interesting because it is also an old and rather crude networking device. I won’t get to far into the technical aspects just now as I have a lot of research to do. Having said that, I’ll make mention of a lady who broadcast all the way from NM. I’ll call her “Svetlana” to protect her real identity which she was actually not making much of an effort to conceal.

Svetlana image
Svetlana

Los Alamos National Laboratory

A hub-and-spoke network has been operated by Los Alamos National Laboratory since 2011. All messages are routed via the hub. The system equips each node in the network with quantum transmitters—i.e., lasers—but not with expensive and bulky photon detectors. Only the hub receives quantum messages. To communicate, each node sends a one-time pad to the hub, which it then uses to communicate securely over a classical link. The hub can route this message to another node using another one time pad from the second node. The entire network is secure only if the central hub is secure. Individual nodes require little more than a laser: Prototype nodes are around the size of a box of matches.


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